CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS!

NET WORKS PUBLICATION CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS

*See “Call for Submissions” post for contextual info and plans for publication. E-mail molteninetworks@gmail.com for printable poster PDF’s designed by Golden Arrows.

PROCESS AND DEADLINES

This project is unconventional. We’d like to be in conversation with designers to answer questions and offer suggestions along the way. Please *RSVP with an expression of interest by January 31 so we may be in touch. If you receive this call late in the game don’t hesitate to jump in, but we hope to know who’s on board asap.

Info/materials in the following two sections must be submitted by the March 1, 2012 deadline
- by mail: Maria Molteni, 72 Easton St. # 3, Allston, MA 02134
- or e-mail: molteninetworks@gmail.com

APPLICANT WILL NEED TO:
1.  Translate a functional basketball net design into traditional knit or crochet pattern terminology
2. Make one net based on your pattern and either:

-ship finished net + submission materials by mail or

-attach photo of net installed on a basketball rim + submission info via e-mail


ARTIST & PATTERN INFO:
> Your Name
> Your City
> Design Title
> Knit or Crochet
> Materials
> Gauge
> Stitches Used
> Written Pattern
> Any additional notes, tips, alternative versions, materials

Following the March 1 deadline, we’ll allow time for feedback, edits, and pattern tweaks. YarnOverTime will then translate your patterns into a visual language for print. Final materials will be due by the early April deadline. This will include a photo of 2 realized nets installed on a net-less court in your city. If you have mailed your first net to us for the initial deadline, we will be sure to get it back to you in time. If you need assistance installing nets we’re glad to lend a hand!

We hope to include 15-20 patterns in the publication. If there are submissions that cannot be included in print, they will be featured on the Net Works Blog. All contributors are encouraged to keep in touch and we’d be happy to collaborate on workshops, events, or games featuring your work in the future.

TIME LINE

January 31: e-mailed expression of interest to molteninetworks@gmail.com
March 1: First deadline- Pattern & Info + 1 net
Mid-March: You’ll hear back from us
Early April: Final materials due including photo and coordinates of two installed nets
June: Anticipated production of publication


ANATOMY OF A BASKETBALL NET

Regulation Dimensions:

  - Rim Circumference - 62” (18” in diameter)
 - Ball Circumference: 30”
 - Distance from Rim to Ground: 10’
 - 12 Rings that hold the net in place: ⅝” in diameter
 - Nets typically have 2 parts: Long loops that connect the rim to a cylindrical body

Think about how your net might move, sound, and function. Unconventional approaches are encouraged. Go Crazy! The possibilities are endless, but here are some tips that may help your design.

* Nets Not Sweaters! Open patterns or combined techniques (ex: icord + filet crochet) could allow for a nice, expanding structure where loops meet a net’s cylindrical body.

* Think BIG! Stay wider & longer than you think you need to. You don’t want to bind off & realize your net won’t expand to the rim. Consider using the widest gauge for hooks & needles.

* Reduce! If you design your net as one continuous piece (ex. knitting lace in the round) it’s good to reduce stitches so that it tapers from top to bottom.

* Collaborate! Want to design a net but not sure how to make one? Able to knit but struggle with patterns? Combine forces with specialists & create nets together. Ask for help! Find a ball player to test your work.

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS!

NET WORKS PUBLICATION CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS

*See “Call for Submissions” post for contextual info and plans for publication. E-mail molteninetworks@gmail.com for printable poster PDF’s designed by Golden Arrows.

PROCESS AND DEADLINES

This project is unconventional. We’d like to be in conversation with designers to answer questions and offer suggestions along the way. Please *RSVP with an expression of interest by January 31 so we may be in touch. If you receive this call late in the game don’t hesitate to jump in, but we hope to know who’s on board asap.

Info/materials in the following two sections must be submitted by the March 1, 2012 deadline
- by mail: Maria Molteni, 72 Easton St. # 3, Allston, MA 02134
- or e-mail: molteninetworks@gmail.com

APPLICANT WILL NEED TO:
1.  Translate a functional basketball net design into traditional knit or crochet pattern terminology
2. Make one net based on your pattern and either:

-ship finished net + submission materials by mail or

-attach photo of net installed on a basketball rim + submission info via e-mail


ARTIST & PATTERN INFO:
> Your Name
> Your City
> Design Title
> Knit or Crochet
> Materials
> Gauge
> Stitches Used
> Written Pattern
> Any additional notes, tips, alternative versions, materials

Following the March 1 deadline, we’ll allow time for feedback, edits, and pattern tweaks. YarnOverTime will then translate your patterns into a visual language for print. Final materials will be due by the early April deadline. This will include a photo of 2 realized nets installed on a net-less court in your city. If you have mailed your first net to us for the initial deadline, we will be sure to get it back to you in time. If you need assistance installing nets we’re glad to lend a hand!

We hope to include 15-20 patterns in the publication. If there are submissions that cannot be included in print, they will be featured on the Net Works Blog. All contributors are encouraged to keep in touch and we’d be happy to collaborate on workshops, events, or games featuring your work in the future.

TIME LINE

January 31: e-mailed expression of interest to molteninetworks@gmail.com
March 1: First deadline- Pattern & Info + 1 net
Mid-March: You’ll hear back from us
Early April: Final materials due including photo and coordinates of two installed nets
June: Anticipated production of publication


ANATOMY OF A BASKETBALL NET

Regulation Dimensions:

  - Rim Circumference - 62” (18” in diameter)
 - Ball Circumference: 30”
 - Distance from Rim to Ground: 10’
 - 12 Rings that hold the net in place: ⅝” in diameter
 - Nets typically have 2 parts: Long loops that connect the rim to a cylindrical body

Think about how your net might move, sound, and function. Unconventional approaches are encouraged. Go Crazy! The possibilities are endless, but here are some tips that may help your design.

* Nets Not Sweaters! Open patterns or combined techniques (ex: icord + filet crochet) could allow for a nice, expanding structure where loops meet a net’s cylindrical body.

* Think BIG! Stay wider & longer than you think you need to. You don’t want to bind off & realize your net won’t expand to the rim. Consider using the widest gauge for hooks & needles.

* Reduce! If you design your net as one continuous piece (ex. knitting lace in the round) it’s good to reduce stitches so that it tapers from top to bottom.

* Collaborate! Want to design a net but not sure how to make one? Able to knit but struggle with patterns? Combine forces with specialists & create nets together. Ask for help! Find a ball player to test your work.

About:

NCAA invite you to Cure Empty Net Syndrome!

Brought to participants via traveling workshops, pick up games and internet cataloguing, the NCAA is a craftivist project that addresses public space, diversity, collaboration, feminism, and interdisciplinary learning. The collective assembles hand-made basketball nets for abandoned hoops, usually via knit and crochet, to build proactive inclusive relationships between artists, athletes, and neighbors. Here the form and function of the “street” and the “domestic” collide in hand-made tactical aesthetics that express dissidence and generate new approaches to public space.

Basketball has slowly evolved since 1891, when James Naismith posed a recycled peach basket as the first hoop for his students in Springfield, MA. Woven nets emerged several years later, introducing a new dimension for movement and audio-kinetic satisfaction. Inspired by the many ways nets benefit the game, NCAA Net Works proceeds by a mapping process and a form of DIY slow production that utilize creative problem solving in under-maintained urban spaces. The project draws attention to the expressive potential of these spaces while challenging commercially driven professional athletic institutions.

Basketball has slowly evolved since 1891, when James Naismith posed a recycled peach basket as the first hoop for his students in Springfield, MA. Woven nets emerged several years later, introducing a new dimension for movement and audio-kinetic satisfaction. Inspired by the many ways nets benefit the game, NCAA Net Works proceeds by a mapping process and a form of DIY slow production that utilize creative problem solving in under-maintained urban spaces. The project draws attention to the expressive potential of these spaces while challenging commercially driven professional athletic institutions.

We encourage you to initiate Net Works in your city or participate by uploading images of lacking courts that you see around town. Click the map below to contribute!

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